technnical copywrite

User Manual for Technical Copy

Many industrial companies have a regular need for technical copy. The markets vary, but the basic need is always the same: helping bright, inventive people tell their stories without making the reader’s eyes glaze over.

The genie’s out of the bottle, but who’s rubbing the lamp?

Promoting innovative new technologies can be a challenging balancing act, but it basically boils down to two things:

  1. Knowing what your whiz-bang wonder is good for. (Note that this is different from knowing what it does or how it works.)
  2. Knowing your audience.

It’s best to identify the audience first, but this doesn’t always work with tech because innovation doesn’t like to travel in straight lines. The history of science is filled with stories of clever people who accidentally created a breakthrough product while they were working on something else. Penicillin, Post-it notes, Viagra, Silly Putty, Coca-Cola, chocolate chip cookies, and even the color mauve all share the legacy of being discovered or invented “by mistake.” When this happens, your audience might not be who you originally expected it to be.

New isn’t enough

While there are always early adopters who crave the latest gizmo, there are many more who view new technology with skepticism and dread. Even those who are interested can feel a conflicting pull between the desire to be up to date and the fear of riding the wrong wave of the future.

The key to overcoming these concerns is to be a problem solver. Identify the challenges your technology will ease or eliminate. Will it save time or costs? Reduce the risk of injury? Improve quality? Ensure compliance with regulations?

“Why now” beats “how it works” every time

A critical part of your discovery process will be comparing the costs of using the new technology versus continuing with the status quo. How quickly will users to recoup their costs? If it’s going to take a while, you may need to consider other incentives to encourage buyers to act now. For example, many residential solar companies use a lease-financing payment plan to give their customers immediate cost savings compared to their current electric rates.

The many-headed hydra

If you’re only selling to one group, consider yourself lucky. Tech marketing often creates the need to communicate with people who have different levels of expertise. For example, the engineers who actually use a new software system will want more technical details than the CEO who makes the buying decision. You may also have to consider the needs of journalists and potential investors. When possible, try to direct different marketing efforts with appropriate “geek levels” toward each segment of your audience.

Remember: readers aren’t robots
In the discovery phase, it often takes fifteen minutes or more for brilliant technomancers to explain the significance of their creations. The inevitable PowerPoint accompaniment sometimes helps. Sometimes.

Drawn-out explanations like this won’t work outside the lab, so distill the message as much as you can. If you can describe what it does and what it’s good for in ten words or less, you’ll have a major competitive advantage.

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